Volume 4, Issue 1, February 2015, Page: 14-17
Adaptability Study of Black Cumin (Nigella sativa L.) Varieties in the Mid and High Land Areas of Kaffa Zone, South West Ethiopia
Ermias Assefa, Southern Agricultural Research Institute, Bonga Agricultural Research Center, Department of Crop Science Research Process, Bonga, Ethiopia
Addis Alemayehu, Southern Agricultural Research Institute, Bonga Agricultural Research Center, Department of Crop Science Research Process, Bonga, Ethiopia
Teshom Mamo, Southern Agricultural Research Institute, Bonga Agricultural Research Center, Department of Crop Science Research Process, Bonga, Ethiopia
Received: Dec. 24, 2014;       Accepted: Jan. 6, 2015;       Published: Feb. 1, 2015
DOI: 10.11648/j.aff.20150401.13      View  2910      Downloads  216
Abstract
The bases of the idea to conduct this field experiment are the uses of the spices and the suitable agro-ecology of Kafa zone. There was no any research activity conducted in the Kafa zone in relation to highland seed spices. It is important to evaluate the adaptability of improved black cumin varieties in the Kafa zone in order to diversify their production and to maximize the income of the farmers in the area. Based on this fact, a field experiment was conducted using three improved Black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) varieties; Dirishaye, Eden, and Deribera with the local check. The activity was conducted in the 2012 /13 cropping season at Alarigeta and Kaya Kela experimental sites of Bonga Agricultural Research Center. The objective of this study was to test the adaptability of improved Black cumin varieties to the representative areas Kafa zone. These varieties were evaluated for yield, plant height, pods per plant, emergence and flowering dates. The test varieties were used as experimental treatments and arranged in a randomized complete block design with five replications. The grain yield recorded in gram per plot was converted to kilogram per hectare. There were no significant differences (p < 0.05) in most parameters evaluated at Alarigata, unlike Kaya Kela site. The local check showed significantly higher grain yield (612.98 Kg ha-1) than Eden, Dirishaye, and Deribera (473.06, 451.9, and 449.62 Kg ha-1, respectively) at Kaya Kela. Based on the results obtained under this study variety Eden could be used for demonstration, popularization and pre-scaling up of the technology at Alarigata and the surrounding areas. On the other hand, this experiment showed the huge potential of the local variety at both experimental sites. Thus, such a potential suggests that the local check or the land race could be used for variety development program which would later be supported by agronomic and pathological studies (fertilizer rate, sowing date, and reaction to insect pests and diseases). This would give rise to the production of adaptive improved black cumin seed spices with specific quality traits at different agro-ecologies of the zone that fulfill the specific international market demands.
Keywords
Black Cumin Variety, Grain Yield, Plant Height, Pods per Plant, Emergence Date, Flowering Date
To cite this article
Ermias Assefa, Addis Alemayehu, Teshom Mamo, Adaptability Study of Black Cumin (Nigella sativa L.) Varieties in the Mid and High Land Areas of Kaffa Zone, South West Ethiopia, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Vol. 4, No. 1, 2015, pp. 14-17. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.20150401.13
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